Chicken Soup with Potza Balls

Chicken Soup with Potza Balls

Ingredients

  • 4 lbs chicken bones wings, carcasses, necks, etc.
  • 12 cups water aprox
  • 1 large spanish onion chopped
  • 3 large carrots chopped
  • 3 celery ribs chopped
  • 5 Parsley sprigs
  • 3 fresh thyme sprigs
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 whole clove
  • 1 tsp whole black peppercorns

Chicken Soup

  • 10 cups chicken stock
  • 2 large chicken breasts cut into small diced pieces
  • several cups carrots, celery root, celery parsnips, white onion diced
  • 2 tsp freshly grated ginger (optional) freshly grated
  • 1 turmeric (optional) freshly grated
  • 1 tbsp fresh dill chopped
  • 1 tbsp flat leaf parsley chopped
  • kosher sea salt
  • freshly cracked black pepper

Potza Balls

  • 1 cup matzo meal
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp kosher salt or sea salt
  • 1/2 tsp black pepper, freshly cracked
  • 2 whole eggs + 3 yolks lightly whisked
  • 1 tbsp cannabis infused olive oil* or schmaltz + 3 tbsp olive oil
  • 4 tbsp seltzer or soda water

Cannabis infused Olive Oil or Schmaltz

  • 3 1/2 grams CBD -rich decarboxylated cannabis flower
  • 1 cup olive oil or schmaltz

Instructions

  • Place all the ingredients in a large stock pot and fill with water only to the level of the bones and vegetables (this will guarantee a rich, not watery stock).
  • Place the stockpot (uncovered) over medium heat and bring to a simmer.
  • Skim off any scum that floats to the top. The scum will make your soup cloudy and bitter. Continue simmering for 4 hours. Thurn off the heat and allow the chicken stock to steep.
  • Strain out the bones and vegetables and discard. Cool the stock, in your stock pot in a sink filled with cold water and ice, completely before storing covered in the refrigerator or freezer. Ladle off the fat from the top of the stock before using.
  • Stock may be stored, covered in the freezer for up to 3 months or in the refrigerator for up to 5 days.
  • Do not add salat at this point. The stock will reduce as part of the natural simmering process and salting it can make it overly salty.

Potza Balls

  • Stir together matzo meal, baking powder, salt and pepper.
  • Whisk together eggs and yolks, oil or schmaltz and soda water.
  • Stir together wet ingredients into dry just to combine. Allow the mixture to rest for about 20 minutes in the refrigerator.
  • Bring the pot of soup (or water) to a simmer
  • Scoop a walnut size amount of potza ball dough and with wet hands roll lightly into a ball. (light handling here is key to fluffy end results.)
  • Gently drop into a simmering stock and continue with remaining dough.
  • Cover and simmer for 30 minutes until potza balls are fluffy and floating. Serve at once or remove the potza balls and cool before freezing for up to 3 months.

Recipes with Cannabis

  • To make any recipe with cannabis, the cannabis must go through a process called decarboxylation.
    In order to unlock the full potential of CBD, you must decarboxylate your dry cannabis flower before integrating it into a recipe. Decarboxylation is a heating process that triggers the chemical reaction that releases the carboxylic acids form the CBD.
    While there are many decarboxylation methods including baking in an oven, sous vide and pressure cooking, the activation is achieved by exposing dry cannabis to heat between 240-295 degrees F for 20-60 minutes.
    Heat for a shorter time at higher temperatures or for a longer time at lower temperatures between this range. For example, if you are using a higher temperature (between 275 and 295 degrees F, bake for 20 minutes max and be careful not to overcook. Overheating can degrade cannabinoids and terpenes.
  • heat over to 275 degrees F. Line baking sheet with tinfoil.
  • Break up dry flower into pea-sized pieces with fingers or scissors and spread cannabis evenly onto baking sheet. Place baking sheet in oven and bake for 20 minutes. Watch the cannabis closely so it doesn't burn. You want tit to look lightly browned. Remove from heat.

Cannabis infused Olive Oil or Schmaltz

  • In sterilized 16 oz Mason jar, combine cannabis flower and olive oil. Seal tightly.
  • Fill small saucepan with 3-inches of water. Place Mason jar in pan and heat on low. Using a candy thermometer, bring to a gentle boil at 200 degrees F for 2 1/2 to 3 hours. Make sure water does not exceed 211 degrees F.
  • Add water to saucepan as needed to compensate for evaporation. When finished, remove Mason jar and let cool
  • Place cheese cloth in fine-mesh strainer over clean 8-ounce Mason jar.
  • Pour infused olive oil through cheese cloth into the jar. Gently press to extract the oil.
  • Store at room temperature in dark cabinet. Makes 3/4 cup infused olive oil.
Stirring the Pot

Stirring the Pot

Episode 46

 

Guest:

Chef Laura Frankel

 

 

 

Stirring the Pot 

 

I couldn’t think of a better way to begin 2020 on The Big Schmear than with the topic of Marijuana and Jewish food. So many states have now legalized recreational pot that it seemed a timely topic.  I went to my go-to expert on all things kosher in the kitchen, Chef Laura Frankel and she even provided two recipes for this episode. In honor of The Big Schmear we now have a recipe for Mixed Green Olive-Cannabis Schmear AND Chicken Soup with Potza Balls. So have a listen to the episode and then, if marijuana is legal where you live, try one of these edible cannabis recipes and let me know what you think.

 

 

Sephardic Journey

Sephardic Journey

Episode 45

 

Guest:

Eugenia Moliner & Denis Azabagic

 

 

Sephardic Journey

I took a bit of a jaunt off topic to introduce you to the musicians of Cavatina Duo- the theme music for The Big Schmear. i think you’ll enjoy meeting them and hearing about their story behind the music. I hope you enjoy the episode.

Happy Hanukkah and I’ll be back with some fun surprises in 2020!

 

 

Introducing the Aussie Gourmet

Introducing the Aussie Gourmet

Episode 44

 

Guest:

Naomi Nachman

 

 

Introducing

the

Aussie Gourmet

 

There is this iconic cafe in Skokie, IL. It’s called Emma’s and it’s a favorite place for those wanting a great selection of Kosher food from bagels and lox to wraps and soups. And this is where I caught up with Naomi Nachman. Just off the plane from NY, she was in Chicago for a private food event she was heading up.  Naomi has more energy than you can imagine. After Chicago she was heading back to NY to attend Kosherfest. And if you don’t know about Kosherfest please check out my episode when I attended back in 2017. It’s really something else.

 

Feasting and Fasting: The History and Ethics of Jewish Food

Feasting and Fasting: The History and Ethics of Jewish Food

Episode 43

 

Guest:

Dr. Aaron S. Gross

 

 

Feasting and Fasting:

The History and Ethics of Jewish Food

I couldn’t resist searching out more information on this new book Feasting and Fasting! I hope you’ll find my conversation with Dr. Aaron S. Gross, co-editor as intriguing as I did. The book delves into Jewish food as a key component to exploring our history, culture, politics, and more. I know it’s going to be my next book purchase. And Aaron offers us a 30% discount if you order your book directly through New York University Press. It comes out in December, just in time for Hanukkah!

Fall is for Foraging Mushrooms

Fall is for Foraging Mushrooms

Episode 42

 

Guest:

Maxim D. Shrayer

 

Fall is for

Foraging Mushrooms

Maxim Shrayer

Maxim D. Shrayer

Are you thinking about seasonal menus for fall? Don’t forget to include mushrooms on your search. After listening to my conversation with Maxim D. Shrayer you’ll find yourself hunting in your favorite grocery store for some not so common varieties to try. And do check out his new book: A Russian Immigrant: Three Novellas. You can find out more about Maxim and his book here: http://www.shrayer.com and http://www.shrayer.com/russimm.html.